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September 01 - September 30

3 entries found

Constrained..
Start date: September 04
11:00 am 12:30 pm

Description: 

Please contact the host (Jochen Guck) if you would like to talk to the speaker.

Everybody is welcome!

Abstract: Understanding the molecular basis of cellular behavior is a central goal in cell biology and a critical guide for medical research. Increasing knowledge of the essential proteins in a complex process such as crawling motility and cell division raises the tantalizing question: Do we know enough to build it? In vitro reconstitution provides an important tool for establishing the roles of individual molecules, but defining molecular components is not enough. Progress towards reconstitution of micron-scale cellular structures and processes has been limited by the challenge of creating in vitro reconstitutions that capture the spatial organization, physical constraints, and dynamics of living cells. This talk will describe current efforts to create functional reconstitutions of cytoskeletal and membrane structures involved in crawling motility, cell division, and cell-cell junctions. The lessons of what works – and what doesn’t – are guiding development of technolog ies needed to assemble biological systems from molecular parts and contributing to the growing view that cellular structures are defined not only by their molecular components but also by their physical boundary conditions.

ShortBio: Daniel A. Fletcher, Ph.D. is the Purnendu Chatterjee Professor of Bioengineering and Biophysics at UC Berkeley, where he and his research group studies basic mechanisms of biological assembly involved in cell movements and develops biomedical technologies for disease detection. Dr. Fletcher received a B.S.E. from Princeton University and a D.Phil. from Oxford University where he was a Rhodes Scholar. He received a Ph.D. from Stanford University as an NSF Graduate Research Fellow and was a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Stanford University School of Medicine. He served as a White House Fellow in the White House’s Office of Science and Technology Policy in Washington, DC and co-founded the medical device company CellScope, Inc. Dr. Fletcher is currently the Associate Chair of the Bioengineering Department at UC Berkeley and Deputy Director of the Physical Biosciences Division of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

Publications:

www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24988349

www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24233724

www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22902598

www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22308368

www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21593410

Disruption ..
Start date: September 19
12:00 pm 01:30 pm

Description: 

Everybody is welcome!


Abstract:
Developmental abnormalities caused by epigenetic influences have been proposed to contribute to the etiology of schizophrenia, as not all individuals carrying a putative disorder-related gene variation develop disease phenotypes. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are promising candidates to be epigenetic conductors because they are able to regulate hundreds of genes simultaneously and have been associated in neurogenesis, synaptic development, and plasticity. Genome-wide association studies have implicated miRNA-137 and two of its target genes, CACNA1C and CSMD1, in schizophrenia. The aims of my postdoctoral work are to understand the function of these two target genes in the formation of neuronal connections and how miRNA137 regulates these target genes during development and adulthood. My goal is to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of schizophrenia, which will ultimately lead to improvements in the diagnosis and treatment of this disease.


Publications:

Transcriptional code and disease map for adult retinal cell types.

Siegert S, Cabuy E, Scherf BG, Kohler H, Panda S, Le YZ, Fehling HJ, Gaidatzis D, Stadler MB, Roska B.
Nat Neurosci
. 2012 Jan 22;15(3):487-95, S1-2. doi: 10.1038/nn.3032.

Genetic address book for retinal cell types.

Siegert S, Scherf BG, Del Punta K, Didkovsky N, Heintz N, Roska B. Nat Neurosci. 2009 Sep;12(9):1197-204. doi: 10.1038/nn.2370. Epub 2009 Aug 2.

Long range ..
Start date: September 26
11:00 am 01:00 pm

Description: 

Please contact the host (francis.stewart@biotec.tu-dresden.de) if you would like to talk to the speaker. Everybody is welcome!

Abstract:
My research activities are in the fields of embryology, genetics and developmental genomics of mammals, in an evolutionnary context. In particular, my laboratory has been involved into structural and functional studies of mammalian Hox genes, by using mouse molecular genetic approaches. For the past many years, the main aim of the laboratory is to understand how the transcription of Hox genes is coordinately regulated, during development, such as to promote a coherent organization of structures, and how such regulatory capacities have evolved along with the emergence of the vertebrate lineage.

Publications:
Soshnikova N, Duboule D. (2009) Epigenetic temporal control of mouse Hox genes in vivo. Science, 324, 1320-1323.

Montavon, T., Soshnikova, N., Mascrez, B., Joye, E.,  Thevenet, L., Splinter, E., de Laat, W., Spitz, F. and Duboule D. (2011). A regulatory archipelago controls controls Hoxd gene expression in developing digits. Cell, 147, 1132-1145

Noordermeer, D., Leleu, M., Splinter, E., Rougemont, J., De Laat, W. and Duboule, D. (2011) The dynamic architecture of Hox gene clusters. Science, 334, 222-225.

Andrey, G., Montavon, T., Mascrez, B., Gonzalez, F., Noordermeer, D., Leleu, M., Trono, D., Spitz, F. and Duboule, D. (2013) A switch between topological domains underlies collinearity in mouse limbs. Science, 2013 Jun 7;340(6137):1234167. doi: 10.1126/science.1234167

De Laat, W. and Duboule, D. (2013) Topology of mammalian developmental enhancers and their regulatory landscapes. Nature, 502(7472), 499-506.

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